Michael Nyman

After Extra Time

After Extra Time

After Extra Time

Virgin Venture CDVE 929
1996

- after extra time -
Michael Nyman: piano
William Hawkes: violin
Ann Morfee: violin
Catherine Musker: viola
Tony Hinnigan: cello
John Harle: soprano and alto saxophone
David Roach: soprano and alto saxophone
Andrew Findon: baritone saxophone, flute and piccolo
Nigel Barr: bass trombone
Steve Sidwell: trumpet
David Lee: horn
Martin Elliott: bass guitar
published by Chester Music ltd. / Michael Nyman Productions ltd.
produced by Michael Nyman with Martin Elliott and David Roach
engineer: Michael J. Dutton
recorded, mixed and edited at Jet Recording Studio, Brussels

- the final score -
Michael Nyman: piano / director
Alexander Balanescu: violin
Clare Connors: violin
Ann Morfee: violin
Catherine Musker: viola
Tony Hinnigan: cello
Justin Pearson: cello
Martin Elliott: bass guitar
John Harle: soprano and alto saxophone
David Roach: soprano and alto saxophone
Andrew Findon: baritone saxophone, flute and piccolo
Steve Sidwell: trumpet
Marjorie Dunn: horn
Nigel Barr: bass trombone
published by Chester Music ltd. / Michael Nyman Productions ltd.
produced by Michael Nyman
engineer: Michael J. Dutton
recorded, mixed and edited at Windmill Lane Recording Studio, Dublin

- memorial -
Michael Nyman: piano / director
Sarah Leonard: soprano
Alexander Balanescu: violin
Clare Connors: violin
Catherine Musker: viola
Tony Hinnigan: cello
Martin Elliott: bass guitar
John Harle: alto saxophone
David Roach: alto saxophone
Andrew Findon: baritone saxophone
Steve Sidwell: trumpet
Marjorie Dunn: horn
Nigel Barr: bass trombone
published by Chester Music ltd. / Michael Nyman Productions ltd.
courtsey of DECCA Records ltd.
produced by Michael Nyman
engineer: Michael J. Dutton
recorded at JVC Victor Studios, Tokyo
recorded, mixed and edited at Kitsch Studio, Brussels

memorial - composer’s notes
After Extra Time contains three football-related compositions -AET (After Extra Time) written during the 1995-1996 season; The Final Score from the 1991-1992 season, and Memorial composed at the end of the 1984-1985 season.
The title AET (After Extra Time) plays with my wife’s (rare) first name, Aet, as it occasionally and bizarrely appears in football results: where cup matches have gone into extra time the letters (aet) are added after the result. It also refers to the fact that the piece was written in two stages -the ‘upper tier’ was completed in the summer of 1995, while the ‘lower tier’ was added in early 1996, a process which literally adds extra time since the 1996 additions were interweaved between the sections of the 1995 piece.
Thus AET could in principle be viewed as a five-a-side match -Team A comprises flute (doubling piccolo and baritone sax), soprano (doubling alto) sax, alto (doubling tenor) sax, viola and cello, while Team B features trumpet, horn, bass trombone and two violins. Piano and bass play with both teams, which after alternating at the start of the ‘match’, join together from time to time. (The two violins also occasionally play material which harmonically contardicts what the rest of the players are doing). AET could also be designated as Riff Athletic v Riff Rangers, since each team features its own riffs -Athletic mainly midrange, Rangers in the bass register- and its own playing style (though the footballing parallels should not necessarily be taken too literally).
The Final Score was composed for a 1991 Channel 4 film directed by Matthew Whiteman, which allowed me to drift from the Queen’s Park Rangers of the (then) present back to the golden days of the Stan Bowles-dominated team of the mid 70s. The score is a straightforward set of variations derived from a 4-note bass line. Memorial is one section of the large-scale work dedicated to the memory of the Juventas fans killed in the Heysel Stadium in June 1985 beofre the European Cup match between Juventas and Liverpool. I allowed it to be used by Peter Greenaway in his film “The Cook, The Thief, His Wife and Her Lover” in 1989 and am gratified that it has now found it football home once again.
The first performance of Memorial took place some days after the Heysel tragedy and Waldemar Januszczak’s review suggests the way in which the piece attempted in a small way to heal a wound Europe saw as a consequence of the harshness of rampant Tatcherism.

memorial - waldemar januszczak
History. It swirls around the great city of Rouen like T.S. Eliot’s fog, rubbing its back along the coloured window panes of the cathedral, hurrying past the ugly memorial to Joan of Arc before spiking itself on the countless gothic pinnacles of the Palais de Justice.
Beneath these pinnacles, on July 13th, John Eliot Gardiner and the English Baroque Soloists will be performing Purcell’s King Arthur as part of the area’s two month festival of music and dance.
Flicking thorugh the festifal booklet you sense that although it is certain of its admiration for John Aliot Gardiner, it is not quite sure what to make of Henry Purcell. To his face it praises him for his “sense de la f?erie.” But hiding behind the compliment is a sneer; the French do not believe in fairies. And is there not deep scorn in the booklets voice when it comments upon the ‘fervour patriotique’ of King Arthur?
But we are looking at the wrong part of the programme. Flicking back to this weekend we see a name more recently associated with Purcell, the name of Michael Nyman, whose neo-Purcellian score for The Draughtman’s Contract established his reputation in France though not, I’m told, in Rouen where the film only lasted a week in the town’s one art cinema. It is not often that composers name their work out of a sense of shame but that is what Michael Nyman has done in dedicating his new peice -a collaboration with the painter Paul Richards- to the Brussels football tragedy and calling it Memorial. Fervour patritique… the albatross has been fattened and now hangs so heavily around our necks that we can no longer lift our heads.
The French as we know take their art very seriously and think big. So big that they frequently lose control of the monster they have created. For the specially-commissioned Nyman / Richards collaboration on Saturday night the festival moved out of Rouen to a disused power station overlooking the Seine at Yainville. With its military bearing and a facade like a cliff-face, the strangely beautiful building seemed a singularly inappropriate venue for a concert. Most of the floor was taken up with spectacular chunks of machinery, turbine and generators.
According to the festival booklet the Centrale Electrique at Yainville is “grandiose, inquitant, fascinant, triste… Une Cath?drale.” The church-like atmosphere of the hall was underlined by Paull Richards’ glass painting glowing in the giant window above the stage, a couple locked in an embrace, their lips not quite meeting, almost healing with a kiss but not quite. Triste.
“The disillusionment with the English that you sense now on the continent seemes terribly final,” explained the painter as he tried not altogether successfully to control the lighting in this eerie and awkward space. “Europe has always known that the English do things their way. But underneath were some strong values. Not any more.” Having decided to risk the charge of opportunism, Richards and Nyman see Memorial as a small act of atonement.
Thus the musical phrase borrowed from King Arthur around which Memorial is built has symbolic as well as aesthetic power. And as with all Nyman’s work we have much cause to remember that particular phrase for it is repeated countless times until its effect becomes hypnotic.
The orchestra was the largest Nyman has worked with. 15 strong, the string and horn sections backed up by electric guitar and bass, and a drummer who used to be with King Crimson. There was also the soprano Sarah Leonard who is the possessor of a breath-takingly ambitious and haunting voice. Through most of the six sections of Memorial she was asked to sing an octave higher than the rest of the orchestra and her song seemed to float just above the music like a Rhinemaiden humming the Creole Love Song.
But the lasting impression I will be left with is of the middle sections when violins, cellos, saxophones and the voice of Sarah Leonard rubbed away furiously at the melody lines and combined with the building, the occasion, the impossible boats passing by the window, the painting glowing in the clerestory to create a huge theatrical effect that had me blinking with disbelief.

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